Boston uses 3D printing technology to bring city artifacts and historical archives to life

0

An effort is currently underway to document artifacts from Boston’s many archaeological sites and make them available to you right at home. For those who have done so, they see it as an opportunity to make the stories of the people and places of those who came before us accessible to everyone today. “Archaeology is basically the history of mankind through trash,” said Boston city archaeologist Joe Bagley, who has plenty of historical trash at his disposal. As city archaeologists, Bagley and his team digitally document and catalog thousands of artifacts that were discovered years ago. “So we have about 200,000 artifacts photographed online and about 25 of those we’ve gone through the process of 3D scanning and putting online,” he said. Each of the objects serves as a tangible link to the city’s past, including a German mug from the 1700s discovered at Faneuil Hall or a woman’s brooch unearthed at a property at 71 Joy St. on Beacon Hill. “It’s something someone wore on their body, potentially every day, it was special to someone,” said Nadia Kline, a digital archaeologist. Currently, 18 of the digitized artifacts, like an inkwell from an 1870s North End brothel, can now be downloaded at home, and if you have access to a 3D printer, you can reproduce a life-size replica. literacy of the women who worked at the brothel, and we were able to 3D scan the artifact and put it online,” Kline said. The goal is not only to engage a new generation with a physical part of our past, but also to help fill in the gaps in the stories that may have never been told. “It’s people’s everyday lives and the stories they lived every day hundreds of years ago,” Kline said. collection, including a 400+ year old spoon that was found in Charlestown. Ultimately, they would like to have all of the items in their database for you to explore. Click here to browse the Archaeological Records of the Boston city.

An effort is currently underway to document artifacts from Boston’s many archaeological sites and make them available to you right at home.

For those who have done so, they see it as an opportunity to make the stories of the people and places of those who came before us accessible to everyone today.

“Archaeology is basically the history of mankind through trash,” said Boston city archaeologist Joe Bagley, who has plenty of historical trash at his disposal.

As city archaeologists, Bagley and his team digitally document and catalog thousands of artifacts that were discovered years ago.

“So we have about 200,000 artifacts photographed online and about 25 of those we’ve gone through the process of 3D scanning and putting online,” he said.

Each of the objects serves as a tangible link to the city’s past, including a German mug from the 1700s discovered at Faneuil Hall or a woman’s brooch unearthed at a property at 71 Joy St. on Beacon Hill.

“It’s something someone wore on their body, potentially every day, it was special to someone,” said Nadia Kline, a digital archaeologist.

Currently, 18 of the digitized artifacts, like an inkwell from an 1870s North End brothel, can now be downloaded at home, and if you have access to a 3D printer, you can reproduce a life-size replica.

“What this shows is the literacy of the women who worked at the brothel, and we were able to 3D scan the artifact and put it online,” Kline said.

The goal is not only to engage a new generation with a physical part of our past, but also to help fill the gaps in stories that may have never been told.

“It’s people’s daily lives and the stories they lived hundreds of years ago,” Kline said.

Currently, there are nearly 2 million different items in their collection, including a spoon over 400 years old that was found in Charlestown.

Eventually, they would like to have all the items in their database for you to explore.

Click here to browse the City of Boston Archaeological Archives.

Share.

Comments are closed.